Tuesday, August 13, 2013

August 13

JOURNAL TOPIC: [today's tunes: "Move On Up" by Curtis Mayfield]

"Action expresses priorities." -Mohandas Gandhi

What are your priorities?  Specifically, what are you doing here?  Why are you enrolled in this course?   What actions can your colleagues and I expect from you this year that will express your priorities?  What does success look like to you?  How will we know when you've "made it"?  If you've ever set bold goals at the beginning only to accept less at the end, how can you prepare your mind to see things through this time around so you won't have any regrets next June?


AGENDA:
1. Journal (normally we'll complete this at the beginning of each class period, but since you're writing all period today, please get a spiral notebook-- if you don't already have one-- and write/edit today's journal entry in it before class on Wednesday)
2. Essay
3. Collect &/or account for summer reading notes


HOMEWORK:
1. See http://drprestonsrhsenglitcomp13.blogspot.com/2013/08/poetry-1.html
2. Finish your essay and post to your course blog by beginning of class on Wednesday, August 14 (title: ESSAY #1).
3. Please read & complete Poetry Assignment #1
4. Research the following quote, translate it, and explain its relevance to this moment/course in a brief comment to this post:
dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe
(due by the beginning of class Thursday, August 15)

51 comments:

  1. The quote translates roughly to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!"
    As far as this class goes, the quote means that we have gone as far to sign up for this class and attend the first day, so we may as well follow through with it. It was the beginning that took the most courage. Since we are now in the class, we must dare to make the most out of it and really challenge ourselves.

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  2. dimidium facti qui coepit habet:sapere aude, incipe means "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." (sapere aude can also mean dare to be wise). To be honest, when I first translated this quote I was a little confused, but it made a lot more sense once I figured out where this quote originally came from. This quote was used in the first book of Epistles by Horace when the main character decides to wait until the river stopped rushing water in order to cross it, which makes no sense, but that was Horace's point. The quote was meant to express the tenacity of individuals when trying to achieve goals no matter how difficult, challenging, or ridiculous they may be. This quote is relevant to both this course and our lives because no matter what your goal is (in either life or in this course) by working hard and trying your best to learn, we can achieve our goals and hopefully much more.

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  3. The quote, when translated means "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." The relevance to class is that since we have already signed up why turn back now. The hardest part is now behind us and our decision will ultimately make us stronger individuals.

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  4. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." I believe that Colter is right on the money with his answer. The largest step in taking this class is committing yourself to it. Once you have committed yourself, you are halfway there. Learning is a mindset; once you are in that mindset you are half way done and the rest comes easy.

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  5. Obviously, by now it's known that the quote translates to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin" (or "dare to be wise" in a looser translation). I see it as us already having started this course (mentally and such with summer homework, our blog, etc.) and now we must endeavor to accomplish with success. It's our own persistence and drive that will be of assistance.

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  6. The qoute translates to "He who has begun is half done: dare to kown, dare to begin" this qoute is relevant to us right now because we have already invested time into the class not only now but during the summer and now that we have started we should finish and prove to ourselves that we can do it.

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  7. The quote translates to: "He who has begun is half done, dare to know, begin!" -Horace. This quote is relevant to this class and senior year in general because we've already accomplished a lot in our lives now we just have to continue along that path with our goals. We've taken steps, like signing up for the class and completing the summer homework, and now it's time to put in all of our effort and finish what we started. It's time to step up and strive to learn and take in all that we can.

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  8. "He who has begun is half done, dare to know, begin!" -Horace. By starting this school year in this class we've started something we all should have the integrity to finish, it also reminds me of what Dr. Preston did with this open source learning class, after (I'm sure) 4 years of starting this he is finishing it, it seems as if he always looks at this quote after having experience with oue somewhat horrendous class we had last year.

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  9. "He who has begun is half done, dare to know, dare to begin." I feel this means that sometimes getting started is half the battle. Choosing to fully invest yourself in anything (such as this course) can be a daunting task and by simply taking the risk to try we have taken the first step in making it worth our while.

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  10. This quote translates to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!" This quote is pretty much saying that the hard part is over. We have started our journey and although we have quite a long way to go, we initiated the movement and nothing can stop us!

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  11. The quote translates to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!" This quote basically means that we have already agreed to take this class so the hard part is over. Now we just have to stick with it and finish strong.

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  12. As seen above, this quote translates to "He has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!" This is relevant to the moment because we are at the beginning of the school year and therefore at the beginning of the journey we are about to take. To finish out strong we need to remain motivated and engaged.

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  13. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!"
    Those who have taken on the initiative to take on this class are already half done with the long journey to come. The ones who are ready to take on the rest of what this class has to offer are the ones who will finish out strong. Mentally allowing ourselves to take on this class was the hardest part of the course, if we practice keeping an open mind then we will have a strong finish.

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  14. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin"
    This can be relevant in our lives in the class or as seniors. In the class we have begun by starting in the summer with reading and looking at the course blog. As seniors we are half done with our school lives. If you challenge yourself in life or in this course you are daring yourself to learn and open new doors for yourself.

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  15. "dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe"
    Translated means, "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, date to begin."

    This has relevance to our first day in this class. During 0 period, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd period you wonder what to expect to see in the class, the energy of the students and teacher.
    You decide to take the class back in spring, and finally sitting in the class and beginning it from day 1 was the challenge. The first day hardest because of the change but will be routine soon enough. Now that we've come this far and know what to expect the hardest part is behind us.

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  16. dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe
    This translated means "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin."
    This is relevant to the course because it is basically saying u have excepted the challenge but need to complete it.You have excepted a new style of learning and need to see it through.

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  17. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!" Is the translation of the quote above. Its relevance to this moment in time is that signing up for the class is the easy half, sticking with the class and following through to completion is the difficult half.

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  18. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin."
    The meaning in my interpretation is that ourselves as students decided we are willing to challenge ourselves, take the journey, and be committed to this class. Committing to the journey is have of the challenge but only you can decide to stay committed to this journey.

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  19. Quotey
    He who has begun is half done: Dare to know, begin!
    This quote is a quote by Horace, a roman Epistole during the Enlightenment period. The quote in laments terms means use your brain. Use your brain and critically think (Oh god, Greeley has forever stamped my brain) about a situation and handle it. It probably relates to this class because it’s Preston’s super classy underhanded way of telling us all not to be dumb****s. 
    On another point though the quote also means to be able to move foreward in an endeavor and those who at least get started or try are so much closer to completing a project or whatever than those who do not.
    DO OR DO NOT, THERE IS NO TRY. (Horace=Yoda a long, long time ago in a distant galaxy.) ((Yeah he aged backwards, it was like Benjamin button voodoo. O.O)

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  20. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin."
    This is relevant to the class because we are allowing ourselves to take a challenge by trying something new and pushing ourselves to our full potential.

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  21. dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe: "He who has begun is half done: Dare to know, (dare to) begin"
    This quote is relevant to this course because we have begun today and have made up our minds to take this course. We are almost half-way done. Now, we just need to carry out our thoughts into actions.

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  22. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin."
    This is relevant to the class because though we have already signed up for this class we still have a long journey ahead of us. We need to commit time and effort into this class in hope to gain enough skill and knowledge to pass the AP exam at the end of the year.

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  23. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!"
    This quote relates to us as seniors because, we have already taken the first step and signed up for a more challenging class. In doing so we have challeneged ourselves to commit extra time, and effort. We have started the journey, but we still have to keep motivated and continue making choices that will guide us on our way to preparing for the AP test. We must take action to become successful.

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  24. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, begin!" (like everyone else said) I think this relates to this course because we have "begun" in a way by taking this class, now all we have to do is to "dare to know", in other words, to LEARN!

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  25. "dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe"
    - He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin.

    For obvious reasons the quote is symbolic to the beginning of the school year; also the fact that we are entering out last year of high school, which is essentially the half way point before college begins. We have made it this far, and have pushed ourselves by taking harder classes and "dared" to take the AP tests so we can help our future selves. We have just begun the start of our lives, and in the next few years, so much of our future will be determined, so we need to just go for it with all the effort we can give.

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  26. "He who has begun is half done:Dare to know, dare to begin!"

    As high school seniors we have begun our journey of adulthood, even if we are not 18 yet we have embarked on a journey unlike anything we have faced before. This journey will take courage but we should be encouraged because the hard part is over, the rest is just the grind.

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  27. The text translates from Latin to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin."

    It is relevant to us, as students, because by choosing to enroll into the class we are already halfway there. By daring to begin we dare to learn, and therefore, we will be determined to finish what we have started.

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  28. Translation: "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, begin."


    Its relevance to this course lies with the fact that this course is just beginning. We are all "daring" to begin it and find out what we'll learn. I am assuming the other half is finishing what we have begun.

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  29. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, begin."
    - The relevance of this qoute to this course is doing the summer work and chosing to do it means we are half way done with this semester's work.

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  30. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, begin."
    Well, us as students are just beginning our school year, Taking a risk and throwing ourselves in this jungle of madness. If we can make it this far, we can make it further. Also finishing off the adventure.

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  31. dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe
    "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin"
    As we take the first step of signing up for this class, there's no point of turning back. So, why not just take the risk and "dare" ourselves to take this class. Finishing what we have already started is the way of success.

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  32. "Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe," or "He who has begun is half done: dare to be wise! Make a beginning!"
    Right now, this quote is very relvelant because for this class, just to sign up and complete the summer homework is almost half the battle. We have "begun," and now we must finish out the year, learning as we go.

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  33. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." This is relevant to this course, because as students, it is up to us to take the next step to "dare" to do the best we can in this class; to take risks. We can't just sit back and enjoy the ride now, we have to control it and try as hard as possible to make it the best experience we can for ourselves.

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  34. -dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe-
    "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!"
    Before this school year had begun, we were all uncertain about what we were getting ourselves into when signing up for this class. Though we will never know what may lie ahead of us, we need to be willing to take a risk. In the end I feel the reward will be worth it. There is so much to gain from the course only if we are willing to endure the challenges set in front of us and so much to lose if we decide to pass on this golden opportunity. We must be daring with our actions future and present. Not to mention be determined to set forth with our dreams and make them a reality.

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  35. “Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude" - "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin" It is relevant to this course because we all have accepted this challenge, and we have all prepared our best for this class. Though the uncertainty of how the class will be, has gone through all our minds this past summer, but I feel we are all prepared. We have already started this course, now it is our chance to use it for the ensuring of our great future. I feel being open-minded and having a good attitude already got us half way.

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  36. "dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude" translates to, "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." In school we'v always been taught one way: the teacher tells you what to do, and its the students job to complete with no questions asked. Yet in this class, we have the chance as students to tell the teacher what we want to learn and our ideas of how to learn it. Although this sounds easy and fun, its completely foreign to us. It almost feels wrong to tell the teacher what we think and to give out our ideas, so this quote is relevant to this case because its our last year, yet we still have a chance to be a little daring.

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  37. Latin: dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe
    English: He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!
    Thou quote is relevant to this course because we all signed up to face the challenge of the course from the beginning (Knowing what we are getting ourselves into). Now that we all made it through day one, our mental process of the wise words of Dr. Preston creates a goal for all of us to be persistence in the class to succeed. All the tools have been given to us which is "half done" with the class because all we need to do is apply the tools into our daily tasks in/out of class to finish.

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  38. "Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe"

    The pretty translation is "he who has begun has the work half done: dare to know, begin at once!" Here's the not-so-pretty translation: dimidium=half, facti=worked, qui=who, coepit=begins, habet=has, sapere=know, aude=dare, incipe=begin. To put it in the most literal words that still make sense, "Who begins has worked half: dare to know, begin!"

    This is a quote by the Roman poet Horace, and is representative of the Age of Enlightenment. My big brother actually gave me a pep talk yesterday saying almost the same thing as this quote: senioritis is when you put off everything until the last minute, and it's incredibly inefficient. He said if you start assignments early, you get to think over ideas in your downtime (bus ride, lunch line, health class, etc.) and make it so much easier on yourself than if you try to cram four days' worth of thinking and working into Thursday night (or even worse, Friday morning). I think that's what this quote is saying: whatever it is you have to do, just start! Don't be scared of the unknown, just go!

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  39. The translation is "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!".

    This quote's relevance to this course is that right now we have just began the start of the school year, but we have all come prepared to be in this class. We have the necessary knowledge to be in this class, so by that, we're half way there, now we need to apply the skills we have this school year, the rest of the school year is just only the second half.

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  40. "Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe." The translation means "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." My interpretation of this quote is that simply showing up for this class, is the easy part. It takes relentless hard work, staying open to new ideas and constructive criticism, to get value out of this experience. Success will come if you are willing to consistently put these three elements to work for each assignment that is given. That success isn't always reflected in a letter grade, but if you take care of business, then your grade will take care of itself. Dare to explore and take the first steps into a greater world with all these wonderful people that are also searching for academic and intellectual enlightenment before they set out to change the world.

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  41. "Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe." translates to, "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!" This quote is relevant to the course because we, students, have already taken the first steps by enrolling in this course and completing the summer homework, by doing so we are "half done." As students, it's our responsibility to take risks in life and "dare to begin." We've begun, we're half done, and now we must continue to strive in order to succeed.

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  42. The frase/quote "Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe" translates to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." The meaning of this quote to me is be curious enough to begin something; dare to have faith in yourself and the opportunities that await you. This quote is not only relevant to this course, but my whole life. I have always been afraid of failure. What if at the end of the road awaited failure? I have decided to not be afraid and take all of the chances that are given to me, all of the life lessons and literature knowledge i will gain to be successful this year. Writing this course title on my schedule last year was the easiest task. I was half done last May, but now i must move through this course with much determination and consistency to complete it.

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  43. "Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe." Translates to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." The meaning of this quote to me is if you're interested in anything go for it. Challenge yourself in everything that you want to succeed in. This quote is actually very relevant to the situation I was in last year when I registered for Senior year I was close to not taking Algebra 2 and Chem so I can have an easier schedule because I thought I would end up going straight to a community college! But I went for it just in case I changed my mind and now I'm at the point where I have to keep going because I started all the classes required. Why should I back down now?

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  44. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." This quote means to me that the hardest part of anything is the beginning. Its hard to get going but when you do why not go all the way and finish. Its relevance to this class is that i've taken the first step, the hardest step, and signed up for this class and now i need too see it through.

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  45. dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe. This quote by Horace translates to "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!" At this moment, most of our class is confused about the new style of this class, and how to use our blogs. This quote is telling us that getting started is half the battle, so jump in, get started, and embrace the course.

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  46. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin." To me this means basically finish what you started, Your half way there, why give up now? :)

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  47. As everyone has said before "dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe" translates to the english meaning "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin!" My take on this quote is that it encourages us to finish what we started, and be hungry to discover while we're at it. This is very relevant to this course because Dr. Preston encourages us to go beyond the standard means of learning and since we've accomplished the basics, why turn back now? I can also relate to this on a running perspective. Getting motivated and up to run will always be the hardest part for me, but once I'm into the first couple miles, the rest of run becomes like breathing air and I venture out into unintended goals.

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  48. I'm a little late on this, but as you guess i will have the same definition of the quote "dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude, incipe". Which means also like everyone else has posted "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, begin!". The way i take this quote in is that, we should finish what we started becuase you never know what is at the end or what it could lead to. Why would you want to give up when you are almost there yes it may be hard at first but the half mark is where it starts to get easier and from there on it's great feeling to know you have accomplish whatever it was. For how this relates to our course is that even though open source learning was hard at first don't just give up on it if you don't understandit because we are almost done with high school and it creates great opportunities for all of us.

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  49. Hah! I'm later than you Ashley! "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin" is the translation and it pertains to the school year, and this class in particular as you have to find motivation to start something, the hardest part is to dare to begin a task that seems daunting. Once begun, the momentum of your own effort will prove to be a great motivational factor in the senior year struggle. I would make allusions to senioritus, however i feel it is more of a mental game you have to dare yourself to win.

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  50. "He who has begun is half done: dare to know, dare to begin" is what it translates to. I'm late i know that but i was always told better late than never. the quote is very true, i never thought that i would enroll in an AP class but yet here i am in an AP English class, behind, but i'm here and trying to hang on and do my best. i just need to stop procrastinating and get in a routine of doing more work than i'm used to.

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